Rage Against the Machine – Rage Against the Machine

Rage Against the Machine - Rage Against the Machine  artwork

Rage Against the Machine

Rage Against the Machine

Genre: Hard Rock

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: November 3, 1992

© ℗ 1992 Epic Records, a division of Sony Music Entertainment

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Rock

Rage Against the Machine: Live at the Grand Olympic Auditorium – Rage Against the Machine

Rage Against the Machine - Rage Against the Machine: Live at the Grand Olympic Auditorium  artwork

Rage Against the Machine: Live at the Grand Olympic Auditorium

Rage Against the Machine

Genre: Concert Films

Price: $ 9.99

Rental Price: $ 2.99

Release Date: December 9, 2003


Rage Against The Machine return to their hometown of Los Angeles for an uncompromising, incendiary set in Live At The Grand Olympic Auditorium, the final dates of their Battle of Los Angeles tour and the band's last shows until their 2007 reunion.

© © 2003 Epic Records, a division of Sony Music Entertainment

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Concert Films

Post Malone Hosts KC Chiefs at Concert, Kelce & Mahomes Rage At Club After

TMZ Sports has learned the party didn’t end at the Post concert … in fact, it raged on for HOURS afterward at a local nightclub!!! Check out new footage we obtained of Kelce, Mahomes and the guys getting after it … with Travis leading the club…

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Rage Against the Machine: The Battle of Mexico City – Rage Against the Machine

Rage Against the Machine - Rage Against the Machine: The Battle of Mexico City  artwork

Rage Against the Machine: The Battle of Mexico City

Rage Against the Machine

Genre: Concert Films

Price: $ 12.99

Rental Price: $ 2.99

Release Date: February 20, 2001


Rage Against The Machine's first-ever performance in the Mexican capital is fierce, funky and uncompromising. The Battle Of Mexico City features electrifying performances of "Testify," "Guerrilla Radio," "Bulls On Parade" and "Killing In The Name."

© © 2000 Epic Records, a division of Sony Music Entertainment

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Concert Films

Washington Nationals Rage After World Series, Booze, Lightsabers & Fat Guys!

It was absolute PANDEMONIUM after the Washington Nationals won the World Series on Wednesday … from the locker room to the streets — and the video is WILD!! The players RAGED with a booze-filled celebration … chugging beer and champagne, while…

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TMZ Celebrity News for Party All The Time


Releasing Rage – Cynthia Sax

Cynthia Sax - Releasing Rage  artwork

Releasing Rage

Cynthia Sax

Genre: Sci-Fi & Fantasy

Publish Date: August 19, 2015

Publisher: Cynthia Sax

Seller: Smashwords, Inc.


Half Man. Half Machine. All Hers. Rage, the Humanoid Alliance’s most primitive cyborg, has two goals—kill all of the humans on his battle station and escape to the Homeland. The warrior has seen the darkness in others and in himself. He believes that’s all he’s been programmed to experience. Until he meets Joan. Joan, the battle station’s first female engineer, has one goal—survive long enough to help the big sexy cyborg plotting to kill her. Rage might not trust her but he wants her. She sees the passion in his eyes, the caring in his battle-worn hands, the gruff emotion in his voice. When Joan survives the unthinkable, Rage’s priorities are tested. Is there enough room in this cyborg’s heart for both love and revenge?

iTunes Store: Top Free Books in Sci-Fi & Fantasy

Ascendant: Republic of Rage: Episode 1 of 5 – Richard Denoncourt

Richard Denoncourt - Ascendant: Republic of Rage: Episode 1 of 5  artwork

Ascendant: Republic of Rage: Episode 1 of 5

Richard Denoncourt

Genre: Fiction & Literature

Publish Date: February 11, 2019

Publisher: Richard Denoncourt

Seller: Smashwords, Inc.


After a nuclear war ravages the country, America has split into two nations. Every one out of 1,000 citizens is born with some form of telepathy. Known as "ments," many become slaves, while most live in secrecy and fear. Michael Cairne was smuggled out of a military facility as a baby. His mother was murdered in the process, but he doesn't remember any of it. Now a teenager, all he knows is growing up in the People's Republic of America totally sucks. A tyrannical dictator controls all aspects of daily life. Without a birth certificate, Michael's very presence is illegal, his future non-existent. But everything is about to change. During a violent encounter, Michael discovers he is telepathic. His gift is powerful, unstable, and a ticking time bomb capable of causing damage on a scale never before seen. When Michael becomes targeted by the nation's brutal police force, only one man can save him: the terrorist Louis Blake, a man with a shadowy past and even murkier motives, who will take Michael across the border into "the Eastlands," a lawless land unlike any he has ever known. But the powerful dictator who killed Michael's mother is hell-bent on finding him and recovering his billion-dollar investment in Michael's brain. He'll use every resource he can squeeze out of his government and military to do so, even if it means unleashing a deadly assassin with a similar power, and starting a war in the process. …A war Michael will find himself at the center of.

iTunes Store: Top Free Books in Fiction & Literature

Bow Wow Surveillance Video From Fight With GF Shows His Jealous Rage

[[tmz:video id=”1_sm0uckio”]] Bow Wow was enraged at his girlfriend before their violent fight, forcefully snatching something from her, cornering her and getting all up in her grill … according to a surveillance video obtained by TMZ. The video taken…

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Patriots Players Rage While Rewatching Super Bowl

[[tmz:video id=”1_nldcvj7w”]] Here’s 53 people who definitely don’t think Super Bowl LIII was boring — the New England Patriots players who rewatched the game Tuesday night while partying at a Boston nightclub.  Fresh off the debaucherous,…

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TMZ Celebrity News for Party All The Time


Primal Rage – Patrick Magee

Patrick Magee - Primal Rage  artwork

Primal Rage

Patrick Magee

Genre: Horror

Price: $ 7.99

Rental Price: $ 0.99

Release Date: February 27, 2018


Lost deep in the forest of the Pacific Northwest, Ashley and Max Carr are stalked by a terrifying creature that might be Bigfoot. Soon they find themselves embroiled in a strange land of Native American myth and legend turned real. Hopelessly trying to survive, with a handful of unsavory locals, they must fight back against this monster in a desperate battle of life or death.

© © 2018 Primal Rage Oh Mah LLC. All Rights Reserved.

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Kim Kardashian among those evacuated as California wildfires rage

Celebrities were among those who had to flee their homes as wildfires raged through California late Thursday and into Friday.


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Urban Meyer’s Wife Was Afraid After Zach Smith Firing, ‘He Has Rage Issues’

2:19 PM PT — The report also contains text messages from Shelley to Urban Meyer on the night he fired Zach Smith (7/23) … in which Shelley says she’s worried about Zach’s “response.” “He drinks a lot and I am just not sure how stable he will be.…

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Rage Against the Machine – Rage Against the Machine

Rage Against the Machine - Rage Against the Machine  artwork

Rage Against the Machine

Rage Against the Machine

Genre: Alternative

Price: $ 5.99

Release Date: November 3, 1992

© ℗ 1992 Sony Music Entertainment Inc.

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Alternative

Big Boi, Killer Mike & Bassnectar Join Tom Morello To Rage Against Racial Injustice On “Rabbit’s Revenge”

The #BlackLivesMatter movement continues.


HipHopDX News

Female anger all the rage in new Amy Adams HBO show

HBO’s ‘Sharp Objects’, starring and produced by Amy Adams, takes strong female leads to a new area. Rough cut (no reporter narration).


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How Neko Case Finally Unleashed Her Feminist Rage

The singer and songwriter has spun tragedy into plainly angry action on her new album, “Hell-On.”
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Villanova Students Rage, Set Fires After NCAA Championship

[[tmz:video id=”0_8tsuezut”]] Donte DiVincenzo wasn’t the only thing on fire last night … the students at Villanova blazed up several bonfires near campus Monday night after the Wildcats beat Michigan.  Thousands of Nova fans flooded the streets…

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TMZ Celebrity News for Party All The Time


Jackie Kennedy Death Suit All the Rage with Fashion Models

Jackie Kennedy was a fashion icon for the 3 years she reigned as First Lady, but Jackie imitators in the fashion world have chosen one specific outfit that has JFK’s blood all over it. Check out these models at the Moschino Women’s Fall/Winter 2018/2019…

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No Sleep Til Cleveland (Live) – Single – Prophets of Rage


No Sleep Til Cleveland (Live) – Single
Prophets of Rage

Release Date:
August 18, 2016
Total Songs:
1

Genre:
Rock

Price:
$ 1.29

Copyright
℗ 2016 Prophets of Rage


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Rage Against The Machine – Live At Finsbury Park – Rage Against the Machine

Rage Against the Machine - Rage Against The Machine - Live At Finsbury Park  artwork

Rage Against The Machine – Live At Finsbury Park

Rage Against the Machine

Genre: Concert Films

Price: $ 19.99

Rental Price: $ 3.99

Release Date: January 1, 2015


In late 2009 a successful campaign was launched by Jon Morter and his then wife Tracy to promote an alternative to the omnipresent X-Factor winner being the Christmas #1 in the UK singles chart. The track they nominated as the alternative was “Killing In The Name” by Rage Against The Machine. The band supported the campaign, donated the proceeds from the sales to charity and lead singer Zack de la Rocha promised that Rage Against The Machine would perform a free concert in the UK to celebrate the achievement. This went ahead in London’s Finsbury Park on 6th June 2010 and is captured on this film. It is an exuberant performance by the band with the audience cheering them all the way to the inevitable climax of “Killing In The Name”.

© © 2012 Rage Against the Machine

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Concert Films

Luv Is Rage 2 – Lil Uzi Vert

Lil Uzi Vert - Luv Is Rage 2  artwork

Luv Is Rage 2

Lil Uzi Vert

Genre: Hip-Hop/Rap

Price: $ 7.99

Release Date: August 25, 2017

© ℗ 2017 Atlantic Recording Corporation for the United States and WEA International Inc. for the world outside the United States. A Warner Music Group Company

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Hip Hop/Rap

Ellen DeGeneres and Portia de Rossi, Rob Lowe And More Stars Evacuate Their Homes As Fires Rage

Ellen DeGeneres and Portia de Rossi were forced to evacuate their Montecito, California, home on Sunday after Ellen revealed that their house was “under threat of being burned” by the wildfires rag…


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Kevin Hart, Extortionist’s Rage Captured in Audio With His Own Words

[[tmz:video id=”0_05b8pwdn”]] The woman who tried extorting Kevin Hart with a 4 minute and 47 second video sweetened the images with Kevin Hart’s own words about cheating and fidelity. TMZ broke the story … the extortionist created a highly-produced…

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Radiohead, Rage Against the Machine, Kate Bush Lead 2018 Rock Hall Nominations

Today, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame unveiled its nominees for the 2018 induction class with a collection of acts covering a range of musical bases…
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Prophets of Rage – Prophets of Rage

Prophets of Rage - Prophets of Rage  artwork

Prophets of Rage

Prophets of Rage

Genre: Rock

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: September 15, 2017

© ℗ 2017 Prophets of Rage. Under exclusive license to Concord Music Group, Inc.

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Rock

Why Black Boy Joy And Lil Uzi Vert’s Melancholy Are All The Rage

Lil Uzi Vert, caught surfing the crowd at Coachella last April, released his album Luv Is Rage 2 last week.

From fearless smiles to suicidal thoughts, mainstream rap is challenging the old black masculine tropes with a nod to mental health.

(Image credit: Christopher Polk/Getty Images for Coachella)


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ADULT ENTERTAINMENT NEWS UPDATE:Gabby Love’s top pick! Click and enjoy!

Luv Is Rage 2 – Lil Uzi Vert

Lil Uzi Vert - Luv Is Rage 2  artwork

Luv Is Rage 2

Lil Uzi Vert

Genre: Hip-Hop/Rap

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: August 25, 2017

© ℗ 2017 Atlantic Recording Corporation for the United States and WEA International Inc. for the world outside the United States. A Warner Music Group Company

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Hip Hop/Rap

Rage Against The Machine – Live At Finsbury Park – Rage Against the Machine

Rage Against the Machine - Rage Against The Machine - Live At Finsbury Park  artwork

Rage Against The Machine – Live At Finsbury Park

Rage Against the Machine

Genre: Concert Films

Price: $ 19.99

Release Date: January 1, 2015


In late 2009 a successful campaign was launched by Jon Morter and his then wife Tracy to promote an alternative to the omnipresent X-Factor winner being the Christmas #1 in the UK singles chart. The track they nominated as the alternative was “Killing In The Name” by Rage Against The Machine. The band supported the campaign, donated the proceeds from the sales to charity and lead singer Zack de la Rocha promised that Rage Against The Machine would perform a free concert in the UK to celebrate the achievement. This went ahead in London’s Finsbury Park on 6th June 2010 and is captured on this film. It is an exuberant performance by the band with the audience cheering them all the way to the inevitable climax of “Killing In The Name”.

© © 2012 Rage Against the Machine

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Concert Films

Ben Bailey: Road Rage …and Accidental Ornithology – Manny Rodriguez

Manny Rodriguez - Ben Bailey: Road Rage ...and Accidental Ornithology  artwork

Ben Bailey: Road Rage …and Accidental Ornithology

Manny Rodriguez

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 12.99

Rental Price: $ 2.99

Release Date: May 21, 2011


Acclaimed stand-up comedian Ben Bailey is America's most desired cabbie. As host of the Discovery Channel's "Cash Cab" and "Cash Cab After Dark," Bailey's following and popularity continues to grow. Now, in addition to his countless live performances and television appearances (including "30 Rock" and "The Tonight Show"), comes Ben Bailey's hilarious, debut stand-up video!

© © 2010 Levity Productions, LLC.

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Concert Films

Silencing the Screaming Queens: Roland Emmerich’s ‘Stonewall’ and the Erasure of Queer Rage

Although I grew up over 2,000 miles from New York City and was born more than 20 years after the Stonewall uprising, this moment in history has profoundly influenced my understanding of what it means to be queer.

I come from small-town Southern Alberta, the type of place where cattle-branding parties are eagerly anticipated social gatherings, and getting stuck behind a slow-moving tractor is a perfectly reasonable excuse to be late for school. Gayness was seen as an exotic urban sensation rather than a universal human reality. So, when I realized I was gay in ninth grade, the queer world seemed an almost mythical place, a far away land. The Stonewall riots, with their pantheon of queer heroes and ensemble of repressive villains, represented the most compelling story of that distant gay world.

Whenever I had time alone, I would flick on the family computer and read about the heroes of those tumultuous six nights in the summer of 1969. I learned about legends: Stormé DeLarverie, the butch lesbian who goaded the angry crowd by fighting off a crowd of baton-wielding policemen; Sylvia Rivera, the Puerto Rican trans woman who threw one of the first bottles to protest the cops’ physical abuse of the arrested drag queens; Marsha P. Johnson, the African-American street queen who led a crowd of queers and misfits into clashes against the police. These and many other tired, angry, and frustrated queers who eschewed respectability in the name of a greater responsibility, spat in the face of mainstream society, and showed me that it’s possible to be queer, proud, and strong.

But when I finally visited the site of the riots for the first time last June, I was underwhelmed.

I had just begun my ethnographic research on queer youth homelessness in New York City, and had managed to persuade one of my research participants, a 25-year-old black trans woman named Jessie*, to take me to the site of the original Stonewall Inn. Together, we sat on one of the bony wooden benches in Christopher Park, silently studying the pale acrylic statues that commemorated the riots of 1969. And I felt empty. The site communicated none of the rage, frustration, and passion I envisioned when I thought of Stonewall. It recognized none of the uprising’s real-life heroes, instead exuding a sense of decorum that masked the riots’ intensity. In fact, if I hadn’t known better, I might have assumed that Stonewall had been nothing more than a quiet, peaceful protest. After several minutes Jessie shuffled her feet awkwardly and looked at me.

“I don’t know why you wanted to see it.”

Now, much as Christopher Park has sanitized the memory of Stonewall with its lily white statues and bland commemoration, Roland Emmerich’s upcoming film Stonewall has replaced the riots’ trans, lesbian, female, black, and Latina heroes with a gay, white, male protagonist from Kansas named Danny. Sections of the queer community have responded with outrage, accusations of trans erasure and racism, and calls for a boycott — and for good reason. After all, this is the functional equivalent of buying tickets to Selma only to find that Martin Luther King, Jr. is played by Robert Downey, Jr. Replacing the real heroes of Stonewall with a cis, white, gay guy doesn’t only erase the contributions trans women of color, butch lesbians, and street queens to the queer liberation fight. It also erases the unequal distribution of risk and privilege in the queer community and contributes to the harmful narrative that, as Emmerich puts it, “we are all the same in our struggle for acceptance.”

In reality, we never were, and still are not, all the same in our struggle for acceptance.

Stonewall is often seen as the night the gay liberation movement began and the moment America’s queer community “came out” of its societal closet. According to gay author Eric Marcus, “Before Stonewall, there was no such thing as coming out or being out. The very idea of being out, it was ludicrous. People talk about being in or out now, there was no out, there was only in.”

However, while this may have been true for white, middle-class gay people, it certainly was not the case for the trans women, drag queens, homeless youths and other misfits who fought for queer rights at Stonewall. After all, unlike middle and upper class gays and lesbians, these radicals didn’t — or couldn’t — hide their orientations, work respectable jobs, and blend into the mainstream in the years prior to Stonewall. As Stonewall veteran Miss Major Griffen-Gracey bluntly put it, “I’m six feet and two inches tall, wearing three inch heels and platinum blonde hair and the lowest-cut blouse and shortest skirt I can find, I’m not assimilating into anything!”

As upper and middle-class gays blended into heterosexual societies as ostensibly reputable teachers, nurses, lawyers, bankers, and countless other professions, it was the misfits — the transgender people, the drag queens, the butch lesbians and the homeless youths — who were living openly, defying societal expectations, and bearing the risks of gay life. They were the ones who faced the police batons, anti-gay vigilantes and societal hate. They were the ones who — after years of repression — finally snapped on that hot summer night and struck back against the anti-queer structures of oppression.

While middle-class white gays and lesbians picketed the White House wearing suits and skirts, trans women of color threw their heels at police officers and taunted the cops by forming kick-lines and singing raunchy songs.

While assimilation-oriented gays pleaded with the queer community for peace in Greenwich Village, enraged queers used parking meters as battering rams to break down the door of the Stonewall Inn and reclaim their safe space from the mob and the police.

And while homophile movements across the United States tried to show mainstream society that queers weren’t dangerous, the screaming queens of Stonewall perhaps illustrated something else: that they would neither accept the status quo nor assimilate meekly into the mainstream, even if that meant accepting danger and risk. They sought to reshape society such that queer people could be accepted on queer peoples’ terms.

Replacing the real heroes of Stonewall with the fictional Kansan, Danny, expunges this history. It delegitimizes the unequal burden of risk within the LGBT community in the years prior to and immediately after Stonewall. And perhaps most dangerously, it minimizes the very real differences in privilege that still afflict the community today.

One night as my research in New York was coming to an end, one of the queer homeless youths I had been working with throughout the summer turned to me with a simple question that has lingered in my conscience for the past year.

“So what are you gonna do now that you’re finished with us? I bet you must have this nice cushy job all lined up, on Wall Street or something, where you can go, drink your coffee every morning, read the newspaper, dress all fancy…”

Although his speculation was said in jest, it had a stinging truth to it. As a middle-class, white, gay guy, I would go on to graduate from an elite college. I could choose to find a conventional middle-class job, blend into conventional middle-class society, and never think about those queer people who don’t have the same opportunities as me. Indeed, if I’d been alive 45 years ago, I could very well have been one of those white, middle-class gays who carefully hid their sexual orientation, worked in the city from nine to five every day, and went home to their houses with a white picket fence in the suburbs every night.

But luckily, I’m not. I can be open about who I am and whom I love. And I have transgender people, butch lesbians, queer youths of color, and angry drag queens who rejected the status quo to and fought to revolutionize society to thank for that — not a cute boy from Kansas named Danny. Not a boy like me.

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Rage Against The Machine Announces Live At Finsbury Park Concert Film

Rage Against The Machine have announced the release of Live At Finsbury Park, a new concert film. Filmed at London’s Finsbury Park on June 6, 2010 in front of 40,000 fans, the free event was the result of a successful Facebook campaign launched by Jon Morter and his then wife Tracy, which saw fans buy the band’s 1992 track “Killing In The Name.”
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Rage Against the Machine: The Battle of Mexico City – Rage Against the Machine

Rage Against the Machine - Rage Against the Machine: The Battle of Mexico City  artwork

Rage Against the Machine: The Battle of Mexico City

Rage Against the Machine

Genre: Concert Films

Price: $ 12.99

Rental Price: $ 2.99

Release Date: February 20, 2001


Rage Against The Machine's first-ever performance in the Mexican capital is fierce, funky and uncompromising. The Battle Of Mexico City features electrifying performances of "Testify," "Guerrilla Radio," "Bulls On Parade" and "Killing In The Name."

© © 2000 Epic Records, a division of Sony Music Entertainment

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Concert Films

of Beauty and Rage – Red

Red - of Beauty and Rage  artwork

of Beauty and Rage

Red

Genre: Rock

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: February 20, 2015

© ℗ 2015 Provident Label Group LLC, a unit of Sony Music Entertainment

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Rock

Evil Empire – Rage Against the Machine

Rage Against the Machine - Evil Empire  artwork

Evil Empire

Rage Against the Machine

Genre: Alternative

Price: $ 5.99

Release Date: April 15, 1996

© ℗ 1996 Sony Music Entertainment Inc.

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Alternative

Headbanging Tot Rocks Out To Rage Against The Machine, Knows That Music Iz Lyfe

This kid WILL rock you.

In a video uploaded to YouTube, a toddler jams out to Rage Against The Machine’s “Bulls On Parade” while playing Guitar Hero, and it’s obvious that he’s got his stage persona down.

The clip, which was uploaded last week, has gone viral with more than 4 million views — probably because the tot has serious swag that would make the rock gods proud.

Watch as he channels Tom Morello, “shredding” along with the song. His facial expressions reveal that he’s definitely feeling the music.

Go on, young star. We’re all just cogs in the machine. Might as well rage against it.

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Rage Against The Machine’s Tom Morello Starts New Label

Former Rage Against The Machine frontman Tom Morello has started his own record label, Firebrand Records. “The label gives you one-stop shopping for all your rebel-music needs,” Morello told Rolling Stone. “It’s the kind of label that I wish had existed my entire artistic life.” Morello has released a digital sampler with a variety of different styles of music.
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Ray McDonald — He Broke Down Door in a Drunken Rage … Baby Mama Claims

Former NFL linebacker Ray McDonald burst through his ex-fiancee’s bedroom door in a drunken early morning rage, threatening her and their baby boy hours before his first arrest last week — according to new docs filed by the woman.  Kendra Scott…

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Jay Z & Beyonce — Black Rage Over Whiteout at Tidal Offices

Jay Z’s office photo at Tidal is kinda like playing Where’s Black Waldo? — and Jay Z is Waldo. The pic popped up on Beyonce’s website this week, and shows Jay and Bey mugging with a few dozen staffers at the HQ for the streaming service — and the ONLY…

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‘Mad Men’ Activates Rage, Nostalgia And A Classic Draper Move

Don’t read on unless you’ve seen “Lost Horizon,” the twelfth episode of “Mad Men’s” final season.

Well, that was entirely too much fun. I don’t want to give all my money to lawyers in order to find out for sure, but tonight’s “Mad Men” episode might have supplied an illegal quantity of enjoyment.

That’s not to say there weren’t serious moments in the episode — there certainly were. But there were so many valedictory scenes and so much gif-able goodness in “Lost Horizon” that, as was the case last week, the whole thing felt like a really good box of fancy chocolates. (Maybe that’s not a good analogy, given Ferg’s gift to Joan. Ugh Ferg.)

It’s only fitting that “Mad Men” is spending so much time saying goodbye and letting us spend so much quality time with these people before they go (and quality time = Glen-free time). The whole show is, after all, an exercise nostalgia, maybe for something that never existed. And yet, what we saw transpire for seven seasons was real, in a way — the bonds between these characters, the love, the animosities, the crisis-driven drinking, the camaraderie. At its best, all of that was so heartbreakingly, hilariously real. So palpable that for all these years, we have been engaged on a level beyond flash.

Think back to the great Season 1 finale, “The Wheel.” Talk about full circle: Now think about Drunk Peggy, traveling around and around the office on roller skates as Drunk Roger played the organ (no jests about Roger and organs, I’m trying to share a Serious Thought here).

Peggy traveled in circles in the place she was known and recognized, inside the shell of the the ad hoc family that had always found a place for her. “Around and around, and back home again,” Don said in that classic Carousel pitch,” … to a place where we know we are loved.”

Peggy was known and loved and resented and everything in between at SC&P. Whatever happened, wherever she roamed, there was always a place for her there. That’s why she could walk into McCann Erickson with so much bad-ass attitude the next morning. Hung over, holding her tentacle porn (Bert Cooper, you old goat!), carrying her box of office supplies, she made quite a different picture from the nervous young woman from Bay Ridge who first walked into the Sterling Cooper offices a decade ago. Peggy always knew she could do the work, but the evening of bonding and getting smashed with Roger helped shore up her self-confidence, which had been brought down a few pegs by the McCann debacle (they thought she was a secretary? Honestly!).

Roger is something of a dinosaur, but he accepts that Peggy is opinionated, smart and stubborn — he wouldn’t try to change who and what she is (“You know I need to make men feel at ease.” “Who told you that?”). For all his dinosaur ways, and even though the night was partly about his ego (isn’t it always?), Roger respected Peggy and made her feel wanted. Don had done the same, in his way. As bad as it got there, she felt at home there as well.

So the office bureaucrats at McCann didn’t have a place set aside for her — fine. Peggy would make her own place there. She’ll figure it out. Our ballerina will be fine, on the work front, anyway. (Note to Peggy: Get Stan’s phone number a.s.a.p. so you can hang out on the phone with him all the time. And also please have sex with him. Do not have sex with an octopus.)

The home of Don’s Carousel pitch, the place where you know you are loved… does that even exist anymore for Don Draper? Anywhere? Not to put too fine a point on it, but…nope.

Sally? She took off for school without him. Betty? She’s going back to college and doesn’t care about his attempts to flirt with her. Diana? Clearly better at hobo-ing than him — she is totally gone. Even Meredith administered the final insult to Don: She told him not to nap.

The beer meeting was the final straw. Nobody puts Don Draper in the corner, or in a meeting with a bunch of robotic men in shirtsleeves who all act in unison. Don’t they know Don Draper is a special, magical unicorn, one who can’t be contained by your walls and sated with your crappy roast beef? It’s ironic that so many early pieces about the show referenced “The Man in the Grey Flannel Suit” and talked about how representative Don was of a certain kind of late ‘50s conformity. There was some merit to that, of course: When the show first began, the guys all dressed a certain way, and though Don’s wardrobe has evolved, he has found it difficult to take off his jacket and become just another McCann pod person.

But underneath the traditional suit and the slicked-back hair, Don was always one of a kind. When the show began, Don Draper was Batman, he was the Picasso of pitches, he was a special snowflake made of frozen unicorn tears. God damn it, Meredith, nobody at McCann got that memo!

So Don reminded himself that there’s a big sky outside those windows, and he decided to hobo it. You do you, Don. You do you.

It could have seemed dark — Don’s impromptu road trip, which is his usual method of setting fire to whatever he doesn’t want to deal with — but it wasn’t dark or dreary, partly because other elements of the episode were celebratory, and partly because, come on, who didn’t expect this classic, O.G. Draper move?

We have known for years that Jim Hobart of McCann was a predatory shark and that his shop was an unfeeling colossus not known for doing things the SC&P way, let alone the Don Draper Magical Unicorn way. Jim Hobart is the snake that finally unhinged its jaw and swallowed these people whole — until they weren’t having it, which was almost immediately.

“Mad Men” likes to hit us over the head with certain things to make sure we get the idea or the symbolism or whatever, and this episode was no exception. References to the falling man from the opening credits have been thick on the ground this season; in this episode alone, we had Meredith trying to turn the bare walls of Don’s new apartment into an actual home, we witnessed Don touching the immovable McCann windows, we saw him staring outside in the conference room, and then there was Roger’s relevant quote (“Even if your name’s on the door, you should know better than to get attached to some walls.”). Everything falls away or gets taken away and is impermanent, as long as you have a place where you are known — and that place is home.


So where’s Don’s home? Nowhere. At the moment, that is.

I’m so glad that Diana’s ex-husband put an extra-harsh smackdown on Don’s dopey fantasies about saving yet another Sad Death Brunette. This season has been about — and of course, in general, the show has been devoted to — disabusing Don of his romantic, self-destructive ideas about himself, love, life and death. Beyond destroying Don’s personal fixations, all of which are rooted in his past as an abandoned, orphaned child, “Mad Men” has also depicted the long process of the displacement of men who thought they were special unicorns. Giant firms like McCann don’t need drama queens or arbitrary, unpredictable geniuses (or men who think they’re geniuses). They want drones who follow orders and get with the program.

Don doesn’t need that job, thanks very much. But who needs him? That’s unclear. McCann orders creative directors in bulk, his former wives and his children are fine without him and even Peggy will almost certainly thrive whether or not he’s in her life. “Lost Horizon,” by the way, refers to a classic movie in which the main characters find a hidden utopia tucked far away from the rest of the world. Don has been looking for that place for a decade now — maybe it’s time to give up the hunt? If a man who has been dead for months tells you to give up and stop pursuing a Death Brunette who doesn’t care about you, maybe it’s time to let go of the increasingly pathetic fantasy about saving the lost lady (who is really just the female version of Dick Whitman).

So now what? Don picks up a hitchhiker on the road and is murdered outside St. Paul, Minnesota? (Maybe AMC plans to commission a retro “Fargo” murder mystery?)

I honestly don’t know. All I do know is that episodes like this are making me miss the show already. For all its devotion to tearing away Don’s various cocoons and illusions, for all its relentlessness in showing how the reinvented Dick Whitman has become less relevant every year, the tearing down of walls has also meant the opening up of possibilities. It may have been gross to see Don reinvent himself on the fly in order to sell a lie to Mrs. Bauer, but that facility is also Don’s gift. He can remake himself into whatever he needs to be, more or less. He knows how to turn himself into someone else. He’ll never be able to turn himself into a drone — call that pride or call it bravery — but in the words of another disaffected veteran, they can’t take the sky away from him.

If you’re Joan? They can take things from you. They can take about $ 1.5 million dollars, in today’s money. And she just has to put up with it.

Joan’s storyline was the hard, unyielding kernel in an episode that otherwise went down as smoothly as aged Scotch. Part of the reason the episode was so good was because everyone was adjusting to a radically different reality — every single SC&P character was responding in his or her own way to the massive changes wrought by the McCann merger. From the start, the imagery reinforced the strictures and limits that had been placed on our freewheeling friends. At McCann, conference rooms, many offices and even the hallways felt airless, cramped and dark. The people we know and love were literally being squeezed, and it made for high drama and some awesome comedy.

All the reactions were true to form. Roger got drunk and goofed off, because Roger. Ted kept his head down and tried to fit in (while secretly cheering the moment in which Don chose to bail). Peggy tenaciously continued to work, even though no one at McCann knew what to do with her or much cared about her as an employee. Don took off, even as Meredith proved that she has finally become a really great secretary (she’s good at covering for Don, which is Job 1 for his secretaries, but lately she has been navigating every single situation with amazing efficiency. This may be the most shocking development in “Mad Men” history.)

True to her image as the woman who does not let the world get her down — at least not for long — Joan tried hard to stick it out at McCann. They wouldn’t let her.

It’s pretty clear that Joan would probably not call herself a feminist, and yet it’s also obvious that she’s been closely following the work of feminist activists of the era and also keeping track of the high-profile lawsuits at Newsweek and Ladies’ Home Journal. Joan has been putting up with various forms of harassment for her entire career, and she’s seeing other women saying, “Enough.”

Part of her that would love to drag the Neanderthals of McCann through court — they more than deserve it — but that would end up draining her of time, mental energy and money, and they know that. So she has to live with a fresh round of injustices — the come-ons from Ferg, the patronizing behavior of Dennis, the furious dismissal from Jim. How dare she stand up for herself? How dare she threaten him? For her boldness, she has to leave $ 250,000 on the table, which is infuriating, but she really didn’t have a choice. That scene in Joan’s office was beautifully played by Christina Hendricks and John Slattery: There is so much history between those two characters, and he was trying to atone for some of his own past missteps in that moment. I loved that he never questioned why she was so enraged. He promoted the pragmatic solution, but he understood.

[Sidebar: I have to inject here that H. Richard Greene has been unvaryingly great as Jim Hobart. It’s terrific that in this last run of episodes, the SC&P gang has had a substantial antagonist in the form of a man who tells you everything is going to be fine so smoothly that you instantly reach for your wallet and your soul to make sure both are still in your possession. Those hard, dead eyes are always there, waiting to be unsheathed like weapons. Under his slick, fake-genial surface, Jim is clearly a very smart and resourceful predator. To mix it up with this crew, an actor and a character need to have a lot of skill and presence, and Greene has brought both.]

Back to Joan: There are so many sad, rage-inducing things about her situation (and if you don’t think situations exactly like this still happen, here’s some fun reading for you). One of the saddest aspects of this debacle is that Joan thought she might make some friends at McCann — her face glowed with hopefulness after the copy writers left her office. They also don’t identify as feminists per se, but she could have found common cause with them and surely would have enjoyed a healthy bitch session about the horrifyingly sexist men of the firm. But the friendships were not meant to be. The men of McCann’s couldn’t abide the status and prestige she had built up at SC&P, so they had to destroy it.

Nostalgia, as Don famously told us, is Greek for “the pain from an old wound.” Joan has very little nostalgia for the old place because they never treated her all that well there — she had to fight for every scrap of autonomy and responsibility she ever got. Peggy was also wounded many times by those who thought she wasn’t up to the job — even Don would occasionally question her work when he was in a particularly snippy mood. She had fun with Roger that last night, but she never had the luxury of thinking she could just coast like he did most of his life.

Men like Roger and Don have the time and the status that allows them to wallow in nostalgia, to reminisce about what was and what could have been. It might have been a hell of a boat, but maybe it was less fun for those front-line workers who had to bail the damn thing out when it started taking on water.

That said, it’s pretty clear that for all the characters — aside from maybe Harry Crane, who is indestructible and still kind of an ass — will never find a place like SC&P again. Stop doing this, “Mad Men.” Stop giving me a twinge in my heart more powerful than memory alone. I’m not ready to let go.

And now for a hail of bullets:

  • Though it was a very good episode, there was a surprising lack of Pete Campbell Punching A Guy. I suppose the king didn’t order it. Sadface.
  • My guess for the final image of “Mad Men”: Don Draper heads all the way to California and looks up Lou Avery, who is on his way to the Los Angeles airport to board his flight to Japan. Don punches him in the face because even off-screen, Lou continues to be the worst.
  • I think we’re done with Betty Draper Francis? And no farewell to Betty would be complete without creator Matthew Weiner trolling us in some way. Of course the woman who was massively immature back in Season 1 and who consulted a psychiatrist when her hands were showing strange symptoms (of what might have been called hysteria back in the day) is reading Freud’s “Dora: An Analysis of a Case of Hysteria.” It’s still hilarious that Betty thinks she has the kind of insight into human nature that would allow her to become an effective therapist. Whatever. Later, Betty. It’s been real.
  • Goodbye also to Shirley, who was always far too cool for Roger. It’s kind of a little wince-inducing that in the third-to-last episode, “Mad Men” explains why it never gave African-Americans significant screen time: The industry is “not a comfortable place for everyone.” Really? At this late date, this is the show’s excuse? Weak sauce. Well, if nothing else, Shirley got a great exit line: “You’re very amusing.”
  • Let me state again that Roger bribed Peggy to hang out with him by giving her a picture of an antique drawing of an octopus pleasuring a lady. I don’t get to write that sentence much, so I’m taking full advantage.
  • The moment when “Mad Men” turned into a horror movie, thanks to the spooky music Roger was playing, was pretty great.
  • This week in Is Roger Alive? Yes, Roger is still alive. I don’t know how or why that is the case. But I’ll take it!
  • “All I found was lighter fluid. I’m not there yet.”
  • Don should have hobo’ed before that beer meeting, just based on Ferg’s horrifyingly bad impression of him, which was more Nixon than Don. I truly loved Don’s plastered-on grin in that moment. It barely hid how much he hated Ferg right then. Ugh Ferg.
  • “I’m Don Draper from McCann Erickson.” And that’s when the clock started officially ticking on the Don Draper Heads Out West Just Because countdown.
  • “Who told you you got to get pissed off?” If Joan had begun shooting lasers out of her eyes and burned Dennis to a crisp in that scene, I would have loved that. A lot.
  • “He’s not going to work for a girl.” RAGE LASERS, ACTIVATE.
  • So in the middle of this episode, “Mad Men” more or less stopped to hang out with Roger and Peggy; it felt like a fan-fiction premise come to life. There was no reason for any of it, but that’s often when the show is at its best — when it’s just appreciating the characters, recollecting their pasts and re-affirming their bonds. Also Peggy drunkenly rollerskating as Roger played the organ is one of the greatest “Mad Men” images ever.
  • So if you were waiting for a classic Don Draper pitch, he gave it to the Midwestern man that was described in the beer meeting — a man who had a family and probably some college, a man who probably had power tools and a lawnmower in the garage. And of course Don’s pitch to that man (and his wife) was a complete lie, which the guy saw through immediately. Nobody is buying what Don Draper is selling these days.
  • How fun is it that Diana the Sad Brunette has a gloomy, intense daughter who makes Wednesday Addams look frivolous? So fun.
  • “She’s a tornado, just leaving a trail of broken bodies behind her.” You could say that about Don, too, although his mentorship of Peggy means that he’s created something of lasting value, in addition to all the destruction he’s wrought.
  • To hear David Bowie’s “Space Oddity,” which came out in 1969, was truly jarring, in a good way. It’s one more marker indicating that the era of “Mad Men” has passed — it sounds so alien and strange, compared to what was on the radio in 1960 when Don and his crew were on the way up. Contrast that bright pop with Bowie’s eerie song about a dislocated man lost in space — a song that is, of course, entirely appropriate to Don’s rootless situation.
  • PEGGY SWAGGER AWWW YESSS!

Ryan McGee and I talked about the “Mad Men” season through “Time & Life” in last week’s Talking TV Podcast, which is here, on iTunes and below.

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‘Mad Men’ Activates Rage, Nostalgia And A Classic Draper Move

Don’t read on unless you’ve seen “Lost Horizon,” the twelfth episode of “Mad Men’s” final season.

Well, that was entirely too much fun. I don’t want to give all my money to lawyers in order to find out for sure, but tonight’s “Mad Men” episode might have supplied an illegal quantity of enjoyment.

That’s not to say there weren’t serious moments in the episode — there certainly were. But there were so many valedictory scenes and so much gif-able goodness in “Lost Horizon” that, as was the case last week, the whole thing felt like a really good box of fancy chocolates. (Maybe that’s not a good analogy, given Ferg’s gift to Joan. Ugh Ferg.)

It’s only fitting that “Mad Men” is spending so much time saying goodbye and letting us spend so much quality time with these people before they go (and quality time = Glen-free time). The whole show is, after all, an exercise nostalgia, maybe for something that never existed. And yet, what we saw transpire for seven seasons was real, in a way — the bonds between these characters, the love, the animosities, the crisis-driven drinking, the camaraderie. At its best, all of that was so heartbreakingly, hilariously real. So palpable that for all these years, we have been engaged on a level beyond flash.

Think back to the great Season 1 finale, “The Wheel.” Talk about full circle: Now think about Drunk Peggy, traveling around and around the office on roller skates as Drunk Roger played the organ (no jests about Roger and organs, I’m trying to share a Serious Thought here).

Peggy traveled in circles in the place she was known and recognized, inside the shell of the the ad hoc family that had always found a place for her. “Around and around, and back home again,” Don said in that classic Carousel pitch,” … to a place where we know we are loved.”

Peggy was known and loved and resented and everything in between at SC&P. Whatever happened, wherever she roamed, there was always a place for her there. That’s why she could walk into McCann Erickson with so much bad-ass attitude the next morning. Hung over, holding her tentacle porn (Bert Cooper, you old goat!), carrying her box of office supplies, she made quite a different picture from the nervous young woman from Bay Ridge who first walked into the Sterling Cooper offices a decade ago. Peggy always knew she could do the work, but the evening of bonding and getting smashed with Roger helped shore up her self-confidence, which had been brought down a few pegs by the McCann debacle (they thought she was a secretary? Honestly!).

Roger is something of a dinosaur, but he accepts that Peggy is opinionated, smart and stubborn — he wouldn’t try to change who and what she is (“You know I need to make men feel at ease.” “Who told you that?”). For all his dinosaur ways, and even though the night was partly about his ego (isn’t it always?), Roger respected Peggy and made her feel wanted. Don had done the same, in his way. As bad as it got there, she felt at home there as well.

So the office bureaucrats at McCann didn’t have a place set aside for her — fine. Peggy would make her own place there. She’ll figure it out. Our ballerina will be fine, on the work front, anyway. (Note to Peggy: Get Stan’s phone number a.s.a.p. so you can hang out on the phone with him all the time. And also please have sex with him. Do not have sex with an octopus.)

The home of Don’s Carousel pitch, the place where you know you are loved… does that even exist anymore for Don Draper? Anywhere? Not to put too fine a point on it, but…nope.

Sally? She took off for school without him. Betty? She’s going back to college and doesn’t care about his attempts to flirt with her. Diana? Clearly better at hobo-ing than him — she is totally gone. Even Meredith administered the final insult to Don: She told him not to nap.

The beer meeting was the final straw. Nobody puts Don Draper in the corner, or in a meeting with a bunch of robotic men in shirtsleeves who all act in unison. Don’t they know Don Draper is a special, magical unicorn, one who can’t be contained by your walls and sated with your crappy roast beef? It’s ironic that so many early pieces about the show referenced “The Man in the Grey Flannel Suit” and talked about how representative Don was of a certain kind of late ‘50s conformity. There was some merit to that, of course: When the show first began, the guys all dressed a certain way, and though Don’s wardrobe has evolved, he has found it difficult to take off his jacket and become just another McCann pod person.

But underneath the traditional suit and the slicked-back hair, Don was always one of a kind. When the show began, Don Draper was Batman, he was the Picasso of pitches, he was a special snowflake made of frozen unicorn tears. God damn it, Meredith, nobody at McCann got that memo!

So Don reminded himself that there’s a big sky outside those windows, and he decided to hobo it. You do you, Don. You do you.

It could have seemed dark — Don’s impromptu road trip, which is his usual method of setting fire to whatever he doesn’t want to deal with — but it wasn’t dark or dreary, partly because other elements of the episode were celebratory, and partly because, come on, who didn’t expect this classic, O.G. Draper move?

We have known for years that Jim Hobart of McCann was a predatory shark and that his shop was an unfeeling colossus not known for doing things the SC&P way, let alone the Don Draper Magical Unicorn way. Jim Hobart is the snake that finally unhinged its jaw and swallowed these people whole — until they weren’t having it, which was almost immediately.

“Mad Men” likes to hit us over the head with certain things to make sure we get the idea or the symbolism or whatever, and this episode was no exception. References to the falling man from the opening credits have been thick on the ground this season; in this episode alone, we had Meredith trying to turn the bare walls of Don’s new apartment into an actual home, we witnessed Don touching the immovable McCann windows, we saw him staring outside in the conference room, and then there was Roger’s relevant quote (“Even if your name’s on the door, you should know better than to get attached to some walls.”). Everything falls away or gets taken away and is impermanent, as long as you have a place where you are known — and that place is home.


So where’s Don’s home? Nowhere. At the moment, that is.

I’m so glad that Diana’s ex-husband put an extra-harsh smackdown on Don’s dopey fantasies about saving yet another Sad Death Brunette. This season has been about — and of course, in general, the show has been devoted to — disabusing Don of his romantic, self-destructive ideas about himself, love, life and death. Beyond destroying Don’s personal fixations, all of which are rooted in his past as an abandoned, orphaned child, “Mad Men” has also depicted the long process of the displacement of men who thought they were special unicorns. Giant firms like McCann don’t need drama queens or arbitrary, unpredictable geniuses (or men who think they’re geniuses). They want drones who follow orders and get with the program.

Don doesn’t need that job, thanks very much. But who needs him? That’s unclear. McCann orders creative directors in bulk, his former wives and his children are fine without him and even Peggy will almost certainly thrive whether or not he’s in her life. “Lost Horizon,” by the way, refers to a classic movie in which the main characters find a hidden utopia tucked far away from the rest of the world. Don has been looking for that place for a decade now — maybe it’s time to give up the hunt? If a man who has been dead for months tells you to give up and stop pursuing a Death Brunette who doesn’t care about you, maybe it’s time to let go of the increasingly pathetic fantasy about saving the lost lady (who is really just the female version of Dick Whitman).

So now what? Don picks up a hitchhiker on the road and is murdered outside St. Paul, Minnesota? (Maybe AMC plans to commission a retro “Fargo” murder mystery?)

I honestly don’t know. All I do know is that episodes like this are making me miss the show already. For all its devotion to tearing away Don’s various cocoons and illusions, for all its relentlessness in showing how the reinvented Dick Whitman has become less relevant every year, the tearing down of walls has also meant the opening up of possibilities. It may have been gross to see Don reinvent himself on the fly in order to sell a lie to Mrs. Bauer, but that facility is also Don’s gift. He can remake himself into whatever he needs to be, more or less. He knows how to turn himself into someone else. He’ll never be able to turn himself into a drone — call that pride or call it bravery — but in the words of another disaffected veteran, they can’t take the sky away from him.

If you’re Joan? They can take things from you. They can take about $ 1.5 million dollars, in today’s money. And she just has to put up with it.

Joan’s storyline was the hard, unyielding kernel in an episode that otherwise went down as smoothly as aged Scotch. Part of the reason the episode was so good was because everyone was adjusting to a radically different reality — every single SC&P character was responding in his or her own way to the massive changes wrought by the McCann merger. From the start, the imagery reinforced the strictures and limits that had been placed on our freewheeling friends. At McCann, conference rooms, many offices and even the hallways felt airless, cramped and dark. The people we know and love were literally being squeezed, and it made for high drama and some awesome comedy.

All the reactions were true to form. Roger got drunk and goofed off, because Roger. Ted kept his head down and tried to fit in (while secretly cheering the moment in which Don chose to bail). Peggy tenaciously continued to work, even though no one at McCann knew what to do with her or much cared about her as an employee. Don took off, even as Meredith proved that she has finally become a really great secretary (she’s good at covering for Don, which is Job 1 for his secretaries, but lately she has been navigating every single situation with amazing efficiency. This may be the most shocking development in “Mad Men” history.)

True to her image as the woman who does not let the world get her down — at least not for long — Joan tried hard to stick it out at McCann. They wouldn’t let her.

It’s pretty clear that Joan would probably not call herself a feminist, and yet it’s also obvious that she’s been closely following the work of feminist activists of the era and also keeping track of the high-profile lawsuits at Newsweek and Ladies’ Home Journal. Joan has been putting up with various forms of harassment for her entire career, and she’s seeing other women saying, “Enough.”

Part of her that would love to drag the Neanderthals of McCann through court — they more than deserve it — but that would end up draining her of time, mental energy and money, and they know that. So she has to live with a fresh round of injustices — the come-ons from Ferg, the patronizing behavior of Dennis, the furious dismissal from Jim. How dare she stand up for herself? How dare she threaten him? For her boldness, she has to leave $ 250,000 on the table, which is infuriating, but she really didn’t have a choice. That scene in Joan’s office was beautifully played by Christina Hendricks and John Slattery: There is so much history between those two characters, and he was trying to atone for some of his own past missteps in that moment. I loved that he never questioned why she was so enraged. He promoted the pragmatic solution, but he understood.

[Sidebar: I have to inject here that H. Richard Greene has been unvaryingly great as Jim Hobart. It’s terrific that in this last run of episodes, the SC&P gang has had a substantial antagonist in the form of a man who tells you everything is going to be fine so smoothly that you instantly reach for your wallet and your soul to make sure both are still in your possession. Those hard, dead eyes are always there, waiting to be unsheathed like weapons. Under his slick, fake-genial surface, Jim is clearly a very smart and resourceful predator. To mix it up with this crew, an actor and a character need to have a lot of skill and presence, and Greene has brought both.]

Back to Joan: There are so many sad, rage-inducing things about her situation (and if you don’t think situations exactly like this still happen, here’s some fun reading for you). One of the saddest aspects of this debacle is that Joan thought she might make some friends at McCann — her face glowed with hopefulness after the copy writers left her office. They also don’t identify as feminists per se, but she could have found common cause with them and surely would have enjoyed a healthy bitch session about the horrifyingly sexist men of the firm. But the friendships were not meant to be. The men of McCann’s couldn’t abide the status and prestige she had built up at SC&P, so they had to destroy it.

Nostalgia, as Don famously told us, is Greek for “the pain from an old wound.” Joan has very little nostalgia for the old place because they never treated her all that well there — she had to fight for every scrap of autonomy and responsibility she ever got. Peggy was also wounded many times by those who thought she wasn’t up to the job — even Don would occasionally question her work when he was in a particularly snippy mood. She had fun with Roger that last night, but she never had the luxury of thinking she could just coast like he did most of his life.

Men like Roger and Don have the time and the status that allows them to wallow in nostalgia, to reminisce about what was and what could have been. It might have been a hell of a boat, but maybe it was less fun for those front-line workers who had to bail the damn thing out when it started taking on water.

That said, it’s pretty clear that for all the characters — aside from maybe Harry Crane, who is indestructible and still kind of an ass — will never find a place like SC&P again. Stop doing this, “Mad Men.” Stop giving me a twinge in my heart more powerful than memory alone. I’m not ready to let go.

And now for a hail of bullets:

  • Though it was a very good episode, there was a surprising lack of Pete Campbell Punching A Guy. I suppose the king didn’t order it. Sadface.
  • My guess for the final image of “Mad Men”: Don Draper heads all the way to California and looks up Lou Avery, who is on his way to the Los Angeles airport to board his flight to Japan. Don punches him in the face because even off-screen, Lou continues to be the worst.
  • I think we’re done with Betty Draper Francis? And no farewell to Betty would be complete without creator Matthew Weiner trolling us in some way. Of course the woman who was massively immature back in Season 1 and who consulted a psychiatrist when her hands were showing strange symptoms (of what might have been called hysteria back in the day) is reading Freud’s “Dora: An Analysis of a Case of Hysteria.” It’s still hilarious that Betty thinks she has the kind of insight into human nature that would allow her to become an effective therapist. Whatever. Later, Betty. It’s been real.
  • Goodbye also to Shirley, who was always far too cool for Roger. It’s kind of a little wince-inducing that in the third-to-last episode, “Mad Men” explains why it never gave African-Americans significant screen time: The industry is “not a comfortable place for everyone.” Really? At this late date, this is the show’s excuse? Weak sauce. Well, if nothing else, Shirley got a great exit line: “You’re very amusing.”
  • Let me state again that Roger bribed Peggy to hang out with him by giving her a picture of an antique drawing of an octopus pleasuring a lady. I don’t get to write that sentence much, so I’m taking full advantage.
  • The moment when “Mad Men” turned into a horror movie, thanks to the spooky music Roger was playing, was pretty great.
  • This week in Is Roger Alive? Yes, Roger is still alive. I don’t know how or why that is the case. But I’ll take it!
  • “All I found was lighter fluid. I’m not there yet.”
  • Don should have hobo’ed before that beer meeting, just based on Ferg’s horrifyingly bad impression of him, which was more Nixon than Don. I truly loved Don’s plastered-on grin in that moment. It barely hid how much he hated Ferg right then. Ugh Ferg.
  • “I’m Don Draper from McCann Erickson.” And that’s when the clock started officially ticking on the Don Draper Heads Out West Just Because countdown.
  • “Who told you you got to get pissed off?” If Joan had begun shooting lasers out of her eyes and burned Dennis to a crisp in that scene, I would have loved that. A lot.
  • “He’s not going to work for a girl.” RAGE LASERS, ACTIVATE.
  • So in the middle of this episode, “Mad Men” more or less stopped to hang out with Roger and Peggy; it felt like a fan-fiction premise come to life. There was no reason for any of it, but that’s often when the show is at its best — when it’s just appreciating the characters, recollecting their pasts and re-affirming their bonds. Also Peggy drunkenly rollerskating as Roger played the organ is one of the greatest “Mad Men” images ever.
  • So if you were waiting for a classic Don Draper pitch, he gave it to the Midwestern man that was described in the beer meeting — a man who had a family and probably some college, a man who probably had power tools and a lawnmower in the garage. And of course Don’s pitch to that man (and his wife) was a complete lie, which the guy saw through immediately. Nobody is buying what Don Draper is selling these days.
  • How fun is it that Diana the Sad Brunette has a gloomy, intense daughter who makes Wednesday Addams look frivolous? So fun.
  • “She’s a tornado, just leaving a trail of broken bodies behind her.” You could say that about Don, too, although his mentorship of Peggy means that he’s created something of lasting value, in addition to all the destruction he’s wrought.
  • To hear David Bowie’s “Space Oddity,” which came out in 1969, was truly jarring, in a good way. It’s one more marker indicating that the era of “Mad Men” has passed — it sounds so alien and strange, compared to what was on the radio in 1960 when Don and his crew were on the way up. Contrast that bright pop with Bowie’s eerie song about a dislocated man lost in space — a song that is, of course, entirely appropriate to Don’s rootless situation.
  • PEGGY SWAGGER AWWW YESSS!

Ryan McGee and I talked about the “Mad Men” season through “Time & Life” in last week’s Talking TV Podcast, which is here, on iTunes and below.

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Rage Against the Machine

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Release Date: October 30, 1992

© ℗ 1992 Sony Music Entertainment Inc.

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